Timeline

A Lifelong Champion

Woods is one of the best-known and most accomplished athletes of all time. As a child, he won three straight US Amateur titles. As a professional at age 21, he was the youngest Masters champion ever, winning by the largest margin in tournament history. Three years later, he won the US Open, British Open and the PGA Championship (his second), then added the 2001 Masters to become the only person to ever hold all four professional major titles at one time. With his legacy long established, Woods now stands among the best to ever play the game. His ledger includes 105 worldwide wins, and he remains second in PGA Tour victories (79) and majors triumphs (14).

2016
Age 40
  • Celebrated the 10th Anniversary of the TGR Learning Lab in Anaheim, CA
  • Opened the TGR Design Bluejack National outside Houston, Texas, the firm’s first US course
  • Commemorated the 20th Anniversary of the Tiger Woods Foundation with a gala event at the NY Public Library
  • One year anniversary of The Woods Jupiter
  • Ten year anniversary of TGR Design
  • TGR is launched uniting Woods’s brands under one corporate umbrella
  • Bluejack National named Best New Private Course by Golf Digest and Golf Magazine/SI
  • Competed in the Hero World Challenge, his first competitive rounds in 466 days
2015
Age 39
  • Announced on February 11 that he would take a break from the game
  • Returned to competition at the Masters Tournament scoring a 5-under-par 283 and finishing T17
  • Opened The Woods Jupiter restaurant in Florida
  • Finished T10 in his first career appearance at the Wyndham Championship
2014
Age 38
  • Forced to have back surgery (microdiscectomy) on March 31 to treat a pinched nerve
  • Returned to action at the Quicken Loans National (June 23-29) after playing his last competitive round March 9 (Doral)
  • Opened El Cardonal at Diamante Cabo San Lucas, the first Tiger Woods Design Golf Course
2013
Age 37
  • Won 2013 WGC-Cadillac Championship; win marked his 76th PGA Tour triumph and his 17th in WGC events
  • Won The Players Championship for the second time (2001) for his 78th career PGA Tour win
  • Captured the 2013 Arnold Palmer Invitational; victory was his 77th on the PGA Tour, his second straight at the API and eighth overall in the event; grand total tied the PGA Tour record co-held by Sam Snead for the most wins at a single event (victory propelled him to No. 1 in the Official World Golf Ranking for the first time since October 2010; the move to No. 1 marked his 624th week in that position)
  • Captured 2013 Farmers Insurance Open for his 75th PGA Tour victory
  • Captured his 79th PGA Tour title at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational, placing him just three shy of tying Sam Snead’s mark (eighth win at Bridgestone equaled his mark at the Arnold Palmer Invitational and is tied with Sam Snead for most titles in a single event)
  • Won his 10th PGA Tour money title
  • Won his 11th PGA of America Player of the Year award and his ninth Vardon Trophy for lowest stroke average (68.98)
  • Seventh PGA Tour win at Torrey Pines, and his eighth there overall (2008 US Open)
  • Tied his own record for most wins on the same golf course, also with eighth at Torrey Pines and Bay Hill
  • Earned his 18th WGC title
  • Voted by his peers the 2013 PGA Tour Player of the Year; the 11th time he captured the award since it began in 1990
  • Helped the US Team win the Presidents Cup 18 ½ to 15 ½
2012
Age 36
  • Won his 74th career PGA Tour victory at AT&T National surpassing Jack Nicklaus for second on the all-time PGA Tour win total trailing only Sam Snead (82)
  • Captured his seventh Arnold Palmer Invitational; victory was his first full-field PGA Tour win in 30 months
  • Captured the Memorial Tournament for the fifth time; victory tied him with Nicklaus with 73 all-time PGA Tour victories, trailing only Sam Snead (82)
2011
Age 35
  • Won the Chevron World Challenge by one stroke (his first victory in more than two years)
  • Defeated Aaron Baddeley 4 and 3 to score the winning point in a U.S. Team 19-15 win at the Presidents Cup at Royal Melbourne in Australia
2010
Age 34
  • Finished T4 at the Masters in his first event in 2010 after a 144-day hiatus from competitive golf
  • Was 3-1-0 for the US Ryder Cup Team
2009
Age 33
  • Won Memorial Tournament; Won Buick Open
  • Won Arnold Palmer Invitational (his sixth victory in the event—rallied from 5 shots back the final day to tie his best PGA Tour comeback mark, 2000 AT&T Pebble Beach)
  • Won AT&T National Hosted by Tiger Woods (marked the 25th different official PGA TOUR event won and his 90th professional career win)
  • Won the WGC Bridgestone Invitational (his 70th victory on the PGA Tour); Captured the event for the seventh time and became the first PGA Tour player to win a tournament seven times on the same golf course (Firestone CC South Course); fourth consecutive win at Bridgestone Invitational (2005-2007, 2009; missed 2008 due to knee surgery)
  • Won BMW Championship (fifth tournament he has won at least five times)
  • Won FedExCup (a season-long points competition on the PGA Tour)
  • Won JBWere Masters at Kingston Heath GC in Melbourne, Australia (his first victory in that country)
  • Returned to the winner’s circle after 286 days
  • Member of the victorious US Presidents Cup Team going 5-0 for the week
  • Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.05) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
  • Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $10,508,163
  • Inducted into the Stanford Athletics Hall of Fame and served as honorary captain at the Big Game against California
  • Selected the Associated Press Athlete of the Decade
  • Player of the Year, as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America, and Golf Writers Association of America for the 10th time
2008
Age 32
  • Won Buick Invitational; Won Dubai Desert Classic; Won WGC Accenture Match Play; Won Arnold Palmer Invitational; Won U.S. Open Championship
  • Won four of six PGA TOUR starts, including the U.S. Open, before season-ending knee surgery in June
  • Won fourth consecutive Buick Invitational at Torrey Pines
  • Won at Bay Hill for the fifth time in his career, becoming the first player in PGA TOUR history to win four tournaments at least five times
  • Captured five consecutive TOUR events over two seasons
  • In his first start two months after surgery, parred the first hole of sudden death (91 holes) to defeat Rocco Mediate and win the U.S. Open; sank a 12-foot birdie putt on the 72nd hole to force an 18-hole playoff
  • U.S. Open win made him 14-14 in majors when holding the third round lead
  • June 16 Official World Golf Ranking marked his 500th week atop the Ranking
  • Unable to compete due to injury for United States Team for Ryder Cup Matches
2007
Age 31
  • Won Buick Invitational; Won WGC CA Championship; Won Wachovia Championship; Won WGC Bridgestone Invitational; Won PGA Championship; Won BMW Championship; Won The Tour Championship; Won Target World Challenge
  • As founder of the Tiger Woods Foundation, honored by Golf Writers Association of America “for unselfish contributions to the betterment of society”
  • Player of the Year, as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America, and Golf Writers Association of America
  • Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $10,867,052
  • Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $76,579,376
  • Lowest adjusted scoring average (67.79), equaling record which Woods set in 2000, for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
  • Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2007 Official World Golf Ranking
  • Qualified for United States Team for Presidents Cup
2006
Age 30
  • Won Buick Invitational; Won Dubai Desert Classic; Won Ford Championship; Won British Open Championship; Won Buick Open; Won PGA Championship; Won WGC Bridgestone; Won Deutsche Bank Championship; Won WGC American Express
  • Player of the Year, as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America, and Golf Writers Association of America
  • Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $9,941,563
  • Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $65,712,324
  • Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2006 Official World Golf Ranking
  • Qualified for United States Team for Ryder Cup Matches
  • Announced the formation of Tiger Woods Design (November)
2005
Age 29
  • Won Buick Invitational; Won Ford Championship; Won Masters Tournament; Won British Open Championship; Won WGC NEC Invitational; Won WGC American Express; Won Dunlop Phoenix; Won PGA Grand Slam
  • Qualified for United States Team for Presidents Cup
  • With Masters victory, tied Arnold Palmer with four victories, two behind Jack Nicklaus, with six
  • With British Open victory, completed the career Grand Slam of professional major championships for the second time
  • Player of the Year, as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America, and Golf Writers Association of America
  • Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.66) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
  • First player to win PGA of America Player of the Year for seven years
  • Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $10,628,024
  • Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $55,770,760
  • Extended record streak of no cuts to 142 consecutive events before missing the cut in EDS Byron Nelson Championship
  • Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2005 Official World Golf Ranking
2004
Age 28
  • Won WGC Accenture Match Play; Won Dunlop Phoenix; Won Target World Challenge
  • Qualified for United States Team for Ryder Cup Matches
  • Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $45,142,737
  • Missed no cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to a record 133 consecutive events
  • Set record with 264 consecutive weeks as No. 1 on the Official World Golf Ranking,
  • Set record with 334 total weeks as No. 1 on the Official World Golf Ranking
  • Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2004 Official World Golf Ranking
2003
Age 27
  • Won Buick Invitational; Won WGC Accenture Match Play; Won Bay Hill Invitational; Won Western Open; Won WGC American Express Championship
  • Player of the Year, as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America, and Golf Writers Association of America; first player to win awards for five consecutive years
  • Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.41) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
  • First player to win Byron Nelson Award and Vardon Trophy for five consecutive years
  • First player to win PGA of America Player of the Year and Vardon Trophy in the same year for five consecutive years
  • Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $39,777,265
  • Missed no cuts, extending his streak of no cuts to a record 114 consecutive events, breaking the record of 113 consecutive events set by Byron Nelson in 1940s
  • Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2003 Official World Golf Ranking
    Finished 2003 with 299 total weeks as the No. 1 player on the Official World Golf Ranking (record is 331 weeks by Greg Norman)
  • Finished 2003 with a record 229 consecutive weeks as the No. 1 player on the Official World Golf Ranking (Since August 15, 1999)
  • Qualified for United States Team for Presidents Cup
  • With Bay Hill victory, tied PGA TOUR record for the most consecutive victories in a single event with four consecutive victories
  • First player to win at least five events on PGA TOUR every year for five consecutive years
2002
Age 26
  • Won Bay Hill Invitational; Won Masters Tournament; Won Deutsche Bank – SAP Open; Won U.S. Open Championship; Won Buick Open; Won WGC American Express Championship; Won PGA Grand Slam
  • Player of the Year, as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America, and Golf Writers Association of America
  • First player to win Jack Nicklaus Award (presented since 1990) for four consecutive years and five years total
  • Second player to win PGA of America Award for four consecutive years (other was Tom Watson 1977-1980)
  • Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.56) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
  • First player to win Byron Nelson Award and Vardon Trophy for four consecutive years
  • First player to win PGA of America Player of the Year and Vardon Trophy in the same year for four consecutive years
  • Leading money winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $6,912,625
  • Second player to be leading money winner on PGA TOUR for four consecutive years
  • Career money leader on PGA TOUR with $33,103,852
  • Mark H. McCormack Award winner as the No. 1 player on the 2002 Official World Golf Ranking
  • Finished 2002 with 176 consecutive weeks as the No. 1 player on the Official World Golf Ranking
  • Qualified for United States Team for Ryder Cup Matches
  • Became the first ever to have won two or more titles each in the U.S. Open, U.S. Amateur, and U.S. Junior Amateur (earlier in 2000, became the first ever to have won all three of those championships)
2001
Age 25
  • Won Bay Hill Invitational; Won The Players Championship; Won Masters Tournament; Won Deutsche Bank – SAP Open; Won Memorial Tournament; Won WGC NEC Invitational; Won PGA Grand Slam; Won Williams World Challenge
  • With Masters victory, became the first ever to hold all four professional major championships at the same time
  • ESPY Male Athlete of the Year for the third consecutive year, for the fourth time in five years,
  • Player of the Year, as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America, and Golf Writers Association of America
  • First player to win Jack Nicklaus Award (presented since 1990) for three consecutive years and four years total
  • Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.81) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
  • Second player to win Byron Nelson Award (presented since 1980) for three consecutive years
  • Third to win Vardon Trophy (presented since 1937) for three consecutive years
  • Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $5,687,777
  • Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $26,191,227 ($32,795,974 worldwide)
  • Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2001 Official World Golf Ranking
  • Set PGA TOUR record with 52 consecutive rounds of par or better
  • Set PGA TOUR record with 35 consecutive events at par or better
  • Set record at Buick Classic with 97th consecutive week as No. 1 on the Official World Golf
2000
Age 24
  • Won Mercedes Championships; Won AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am; Won Bay Hill Invitational; Won Memorial Tournament; Won U.S. Open Championship; Won British Open Championship; Won PGA Championship; Won WGC NEC Invitational; Won Bell Canadian Open; Won Johnnie Walker Classic; Won PGA Grand Slam; Won WGC EMC World Cup (team title with David Duval)
  • Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year (the first person to win the award more than once)
  • Male Athlete of the Year: The Associated Press (he and Michael Jordan are the only athletes to win the award three times)
  • Male Athlete of the Year: ESPY (for the third time in four years and winner of four ESPY awards for a record total of 11 career ESPY awards)
  • Player of the Year, as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America, and Golf Writers Association of America
  • The Sporting News Most Powerful Person in Sports
  • L’Equipe (France) World Champion of Champions
  • Reuters Sportsman of the Year
  • World Sportsman of the Year, as chosen by the founding members of the World Sports Academy in voting for the Laureus Sports Awards
  • Lowest actual scoring average (68.17), breaking Byron Nelson’s record (68.33) in 1945
  • Lowest adjusted scoring average (67.79) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America) and breaking the record (68.43) which Woods set in 1999
  • Leading money-winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $9,188,321 (most ever won in a single year)
  • Won $11,034,530 worldwide in 25 events
  • Career money-leader on PGA TOUR with $20,503,450 ($25,024,412 worldwide)
  • Mark H. McCormack Award-winner as the No. 1 player on the 2000 Official World Golf Ranking.
  • Qualified for United States Team for Presidents Cup
  • Became the first to be under par in every event played on the PGA TOUR for an entire year
  • Rallied for fifth and sixth consecutive victories, the longest PGA TOUR winning streak since Ben Hogan’s six in a row in 1948
  • Became PGA TOUR’s career leading money winner after AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am with over $12.8 million
  • Became career victories leader (20) among active players on PGA TOUR by winning the U.S. Open
  • Became the first ever to have won the U.S. Open, U.S. Amateur and U.S. Junior Amateur titles
  • Set U.S. Open record for margin of victory (15 strokes), surpassing the 11-stroke margin by Willie Smith in 1899; also set major championship record, surpassing the 13-stroke margin by Old Tom Morris in 1862 British Open
  • Set U.S. Open record for lowest score in relation to par, 12 under par
  • Became the fifth player to lead U.S. Open from start to finish without being tied at end of any round
  • With British Open victory, became the fifth ever and the youngest to complete the career Grand Slam of professional major championships, following Jack Nicklaus (age 26) Gary Player (29), Gene Sarazen (33) and Ben Hogan (40)
  • Became the sixth to win the U.S. Open and British Open in the same year
  • Set British Open and major championship records for the lowest score in relation to par, 19 under par, 269
  • With PGA Championship victory, became the first since Ben Hogan in 1953 to win three major championships in the same year
  • Became the first since 1936-37 to win the PGA Championship in consecutive years
  • Became the first to win the U.S. Open, British Open and PGA Championship in the same year
  • Set PGA Championship record for the lowest score in relation to par, 18 under par, 270 (Shared with Bob May, who lost in three-hole playoff)
1999
Age 23
  • Won Buick Invitational; Won Deutsche Bank – SAP Open (Germany); Won Memorial Tournament; Won Motorola Western Open; Won PGA Championship (fifth youngest to win at age 23 years, seven months, 16 days); Won WGC NEC Invitational; Won National Car Rental Classic; Won Tour Championship; Won WGC American Express Championship; Won World Cup individual and team titles (with Mark O’Meara); Won PGA Grand Slam
  • Won four consecutive PGA TOUR events, the first to do that since Ben Hogan in 1953
  • World Sportsman of the Year, as chosen by the founding members of the World Sports Academy in voting for the Laureus Sports Awards
  • Player of the Year, as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America, and Golf Writers Association of America
  • Male Athlete of the Year: The Associated Press (awarded for the second time in three years)
  • Male Athlete of the Year: ESPY (for the second time in three years and ESPY Golfer of the Decade)
  • Lowest adjusted scoring average (68.43) for Byron Nelson Award (PGA TOUR) and Vardon Trophy (PGA of America)
  • Leading money winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $6,616,585 (most ever won in a single year); Won $7,681,625 worldwide in 25 events
  • Mark H. McCormack Award winner as the No. 1 player on the 1999 Official World Golf Ranking
  • Qualified for United States Team for Ryder Cup Matches
1998
Age 22
  • Won Johnnie Walker Classic (Thailand); Won BellSouth Classic; Won PGA Grand Slam
  • Mark H. McCormack Award winner as the No. 1 player on the 1998 Official World Golf Ranking
  • Qualified for United States Team for Presidents Cup
1997
Age 21
  • Won Masters Tournament (first professional major championship); Won Mercedes Championships; Won Asian Honda Classic (Thailand); Won GTE Byron Nelson Classic; Won Motorola Western Open
  • Player of the Year, as selected by PGA TOUR (Jack Nicklaus Award), PGA of America, and Golf Writers Association of America
  • Male Athlete of the Year: The Associated Press
  • Leading money winner on PGA TOUR (Arnold Palmer Award) with $2,066,833 (most ever won in a single year)
  • Qualified for United States Team for Ryder Cup Matches
  • Set Masters record for youngest champion (21 years, three months, 14 days) and became the first major champion of African or Asian heritage
  • Set Masters 72-hole record with a total of 270 (70-66-65-69) and set Masters record with 12-stroke victory margin
  • Achieved No. 1 world ranking in his 42nd week as a professional and became the youngest-ever No. 1 golfer (21 years, 24 weeks)
1996
Age 20
  • Won Disney World/Oldsmobile Classic; Won Las Vegas Invitational; Won U.S. Amateur Championship, Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club, Cornelius, Oregon (only golfer ever to win three consecutive titles, record 18 consecutive match-play victories); Won NCAA Championship, The Honors Course, Chattanooga, Tennessee, with scores of 69-67-69-80—285; Won Pac-10 Championship (short course-record 61); Won NCAA West Regional
  • Founded the Tiger Woods Foundation
  • Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year
  • PGA TOUR Rookie of the Year
  • Missed cut in Masters Tournament with scores of 75-75—150
  • Player of the Year: Fred Haskins College, Jack Nicklaus College, Pac-10
  • First Team All-American
  • Tied British Open 72-hole record for an amateur with total of 281 (75-66-70-70) at Royal Lytham & St. Annes, England; his second round five-under 66 was the lowest by an amateur since 1950
  • Earned $940,420 worldwide in 11 tournaments as a professional, an average of $85,493 per event (earned $790,594 on the PGA TOUR in eight events as a professional, finishing 25th on the money list)
  • Became the first player to win twice in his first year on the PGA TOUR since 1990
  • Advanced to No. 33 on the world ranking, the fastest rise into the top 50 in history
1995
Age 19
  • Won U.S. Amateur Championship, Newport Country Club, Newport, Rhode Island
  • Tied 41st in Masters Tournament (first professional major championship) with scores of 72-72-77-72—293 (only amateur to make the cut)
  • Tied 67th in British Open at St. Andrews, Scotland with scores of 74-71-72-78—295
  • Played in Motorola Western Open on PGA TOUR and Scottish Open on PGA European Tour
  • Player of the Year: Pac-10
  • First Team All-American
  • Member: United States Team in Walker Cup Match in Porthcawl, Wales
1994
Age 18
  • Won U.S. Amateur Championship, Sawgrass in Ponte Vedra Beach, FL (youngest ever to win; largest comeback ever); Won Western Amateur Championship; Won Southern California Golf Association Amateur Championship; Won Pacific Northwest Amateur Championship; Won William Tucker Invitational (first collegiate event); Won Jerry Pate Invitational
  • Played in the Johnnie Walker Asian Classic (Thailand)
  • Played in the following PGA TOUR events: Nestle Invitational, Buick Classic, Motorola Western Open
  • Player of the Year: Los Angeles Times
  • Man of the Year: Golf World
  • Member: United States Team at the World Amateur Team Championships in Versailles, France (led team to an 11-stroke victory by shooting rounds of 71-75-67-72—285)
1993
Age 17
  • Won U.S. Junior Amateur Championship (third time)
  • Played in the following PGA TOUR events: Nissan Los Angeles Open, Honda Classic, GTE Byron Nelson Classic
  • Player of the Year: Golf World, Southern California
  • Accepted scholarship at Stanford University in November, 1993 (to enter Stanford in 1994)
1992
Age 16
  • Won U.S. Junior Amateur Championship (only golfer to win twice until 2011)
  • Played in Nissan Los Angeles Open on PGA TOUR and U.S. Open Sectional Qualifying
  • Player of the Year: Golf Digest, Golf World, Southern California
  • Amateur of the Year: Titleist-Golfweek National
1991
Age 15
  • Won U.S. Junior Amateur Championship (youngest ever to win until 2010)
  • Won Optimist International Junior World (sixth time)
  • Player of the Year: AJGA, Golf Digest, Southern California
  • Amateur of the Year: Titleist-Golfweek National
  • First Team Rolex Junior All-American
  • Participated in U.S. Amateur Championship
1990
Age 14
  • Won Optimist International Junior World (fifth time); Won Insurance Youth Golf Classic (Big “I”) National (youngest ever to win)
  • Player of the Year: Southern California
1982-1989
Ages 6-13
  • Won Optimist International Junior World at ages 8, 9, 12 and 13
  • Appeared on Today Show, Good Morning America, ESPN, CBS, NBC and ABC
  • First hole in one, age 6, May 12, 1982
  • Handicaps of 2 at age 11, scratch at age 13
1978-1981
Ages 2-5
  • Appeared on CBS News and The Mike Douglas Show, putting with Bob Hope (age 2)
  • Shot 48 for nine holes at Navy Golf Club in Cypress, California (age 3)
  • Appeared on That’s Incredible (age 5)